Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

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Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2014
Summary Of Significant Accounting Policies Policies  
Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiary. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. Significant estimates used are those related to stock-based compensation, the valuation of the derivative liabilities, asset impairments, the valuation and useful lives of depreciable tangible and certain intangible assets, the fair value of common stock used in acquisitions of businesses, the fair value of assets and liabilities acquired in acquisitions of businesses, and the valuation allowance of deferred tax assets. Management believes that these estimates are reasonable; however, actual results may differ from these estimates.

Derivative Financial Instruments

We do not use derivative instruments to hedge exposures to cash flow, market or foreign currency risks.

 

We review the terms of the common stock, warrants and convertible debt we issue to determine whether there are embedded derivative instruments, including embedded conversion options, which are required to be bifurcated and accounted for separately as derivative financial instruments. In circumstances where the host instrument contains more than one embedded derivative instrument, including the conversion option, that is required to be bifurcated, the bifurcated derivative instruments are accounted for as a single, compound derivative instrument.

 

Bifurcated embedded derivatives are initially recorded at fair value and are then revalued at each reporting date with changes in the fair value reported as non-operating income or expense. When the equity or convertible debt instruments contain embedded derivative instruments that are to be bifurcated and accounted for as liabilities, the total proceeds received are first allocated to the fair value of all the bifurcated derivative instruments. The remaining proceeds, if any, are then allocated to the host instruments themselves, usually resulting in those instruments being recorded at a discount from their face value.

 

The fair values of the derivatives are estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation model. The model utilizes a series of inputs and assumptions to arrive at a fair value at the date of inception and each reporting period. Some of the key assumptions include the likelihood of future financing, stock price volatility, and discount rates.

Revenue Recognition and Concentrations

Our “C4” Mobile Marketing and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and Txtstation Control Center platforms are hosted solutions. We generate revenue from licensing our software to clients in our software as a service (SaaS) model, per-message and per-minute transactional fees, and customized professional services. We recognize license fees over the period of the contract, service fees as the services are performed, and per-message or per-minute transaction revenue when the transaction takes place. We recognize revenue at the time that the services are rendered, the selling price is fixed, and collection is reasonably assured, provided no significant obligations remain. We consider authoritative guidance on multiple deliverables in determining whether each deliverable represents a separate unit of accounting. As for the Mobivity and Boomtext platforms, which are both hosted solutions, revenue is principally derived from subscription fees from customers. The subscription fee is billed on a month to month basis with no contractual term and is collected by credit card for Mobivity and collected by cash and credit card for Boomtext. Revenue is recognized at the time that the services are rendered and the selling price is fixed with a set range of plans. For our SmartReceipt platform, which is a hosted solution, revenue is principally derived from subscription fees from customers. The subscription fee is billed on a month to month basis with primarily no contractual term and is collected by cash. Cash received in advance of the performance of services is recorded as deferred revenue.

 

We generate revenue from the Stampt App through customer agreements with business owners.  Revenue is principally derived from monthly subscription fees which provide a license for unlimited use of the Stampt App by the business owners and their customers.  The subscription fee is billed each month to the business owner.  Revenue is recognized monthly as the subscription revenues are billed.  There are no per-minute or transaction fees associated with the Stampt App.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, one customer accounted for 16% and 29%, respectively, of our revenues.

Comprehensive Income (Loss)

Comprehensive income (loss) is defined as the change in equity during a period from transactions and other events and circumstances from non-owner sources. We are required to record all components of comprehensive income (loss) in the consolidated financial statements in the period in which they are recognized. Net income (loss) and other comprehensive income (loss), including foreign currency translation adjustments and unrealized gains and losses on investments, are reported, net of their related tax effect, to arrive at comprehensive income (loss). For the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, the comprehensive loss was equal to the net loss.

Net Loss Per Common Share

Basic net loss per share excludes any dilutive effects of options, shares subject to repurchase and warrants. Diluted net loss per share includes the impact of potentially dilutive securities. During the three month ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, we had securities outstanding which could potentially dilute basic earnings per share in the future, but were excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share, as their effect would have been anti-dilutive.

Reclassifications

Certain amounts from prior periods have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Accounting standards promulgated by the FASB are subject to change. Changes in such standards may have an impact on the Company’s future financial statements. The following are a summary of recent accounting developments.

 

In July 2013, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2013-11: Presentation of an Unrecognized Tax Benefit When a Net Operating Loss Carryforward, a Similar Tax Loss, or a Tax Credit Carryforward Exists. The new guidance requires that unrecognized tax benefits be presented on a net basis with the deferred tax assets for such carryforwards. This new guidance is effective for fiscal years and interim periods within those years beginning after December 15, 2013. We do not expect the adoption of the new provisions to have a material impact on our financial condition or results of operations.

 

In February 2013, FASB issued ASU No. 2013-02, Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reporting of Amounts Reclassified Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income, to improve the transparency of reporting these reclassifications. Other comprehensive income includes gains and losses that are initially excluded from net income for an accounting period. Those gains and losses are later reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income into net income. The amendments in the ASU do not change the current requirements for reporting net income or other comprehensive income in financial statements. All of the information that this ASU requires already is required to be disclosed elsewhere in the financial statements under U.S. GAAP. The new amendments will require an organization to:

 

  - Present (either on the face of the statement where net income is presented or in the notes) the effects on the line items of net income of significant amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income - but only if the item reclassified is required under U.S. GAAP to be reclassified to net income in its entirety in the same reporting period; and

 

  - Cross-reference to other disclosures currently required under U.S. GAAP for other reclassification items (that are not required under U.S. GAAP) to be reclassified directly to net income in their entirety in the same reporting period. This would be the case when a portion of the amount reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income is initially transferred to a balance sheet account (e.g., inventory for pension-related amounts) instead of directly to income or expense.

  

The amendments apply to all public and private companies that report items of other comprehensive income. Public companies are required to comply with these amendments for all reporting periods (interim and annual). The amendments are effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2012, for public companies. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of ASU No. 2013-02 did not have a material impact on our financial position or results of operations.

 

In January 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-01, Balance Sheet (Topic 210): Clarifying the Scope of Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities, which clarifies which instruments and transactions are subject to the offsetting disclosure requirements originally established by ASU 2011-11. The new ASU addresses preparer concerns that the scope of the disclosure requirements under ASU 2011-11 was overly broad and imposed unintended costs that were not commensurate with estimated benefits to financial statement users. In choosing to narrow the scope of the offsetting disclosures, the Board determined that it could make them more operable and cost effective for preparers while still giving financial statement users sufficient information to analyze the most significant presentation differences between financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and those prepared under IFRSs. Like ASU 2011-11, the amendments in this update will be effective for fiscal periods beginning on, or after January 1, 2013. The adoption of ASU 2013-01 did not have a material impact on our financial position or results of operations.

 

In October 2012, the FASB issued ASU 2012-04, “Technical Corrections and Improvements” in Accounting Standards Update No. 2012-04. The amendments in this update cover a wide range of Topics in the Accounting Standards Codification. These amendments include technical corrections and improvements to the Accounting Standards Codification and conforming amendments related to fair value measurements. The amendments in this update will be effective for fiscal periods beginning after December 15, 2012. The adoption of ASU 2012-04 is not expected to have a material impact on our financial position or results of operations.

 

 In August 2012, the FASB issued ASU 2012-03, “Technical Amendments and Corrections to SEC Sections: Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin (SAB) No. 114, Technical Amendments Pursuant to SEC Release No. 33-9250, and Corrections Related to FASB Accounting Standards Update 2010-22 (SEC Update)” in Accounting Standards Update No. 2012-03. This update amends various SEC paragraphs pursuant to the issuance of SAB No. 114. The adoption of ASU 2012-03 is not expected to have a material impact on our financial position or results of operations.

 

In July 2012, the FASB issued ASU 2012-02, "Testing Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets for Impairment" in Accounting Standards Update No.  2012-02. ASU 2012-2 allows entities to use a qualitative approach to test indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment. ASU No. 2012-02 permits an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of the indefinite-lived intangible asset is less than its carrying value. If it is concluded that this is the case, it is necessary to perform the currently prescribed quantitative impairment test. Otherwise, the quantitative impairment test is not required. ASU No. 2012-02 is effective for annual and interim impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after September 15, 2012, with early adoption permitted. The adoption of the provisions of ASU No. 2012-02 will not have a material impact on the Company's financial position or results of operations.